A Blog of Very Little Brain

'What does Crustimoney Proseedcake mean?' said Pooh. 'For I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words Bother me.'

Archive for the ‘Television’ Category

I can’t stop linking!

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This isn’t going to make any sense whatsoever, but it’s intentional that way.

Just learned that classical Star Trek episodes are about to get some CG (computer graphics) face lifting. If this isn’t worth the Spider Jerusalem award, then I don’t know what. Don’t evny the poor sod who’s going to do that. He should either have a very thick skin, or a secret identity. Hopefully one that doesn’t need a headless Shakespeare statue to change. At any rate, it can’t be as bad as being the annual Madden NFL cover pro-football player. Or designing what is either the world’s most convulted system, or the best use of high-tech irony I’ve ever seen.

Oh, and it’s the late, but great, Jack Kirby’s birthday, the man who, like B.B. Kind could either draw, or write, but not both at the same time. I still think Jason Blood looks like Peter Parker.

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Written by Erez

Tuesday, August 29, 2006 at 22:16

A pirate I was meant to be

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I take it everyone who happen to this site this has read Watchmen, Alan Moore’s seminal masterpiece. I’m saying “read” I mean either read it, or will do so immediately. There’s just no excuse for not reading/owning/knowing it by heart. One of the layers in this opus’ complex weave of threads is the “Tales of the Black Freighter”, which is a pirate comic book being read by one of the side characters in the book. Later we find that the creator was one of those working for Ozymandys at the island… all right, I’ll spare the spoilers in the rare case you haven’t read the book.
At any rate, the concept of comic within comic serves both as an atmosphere setter (a very dark and foreboding one), as well as another method of realising this alternate reality. You see, in the world of Watchmen, superheroes are a reality, therefore, they don’t occupy the comics. In their place, pirates have become the comic books mainstay. This isn’t completely far-fetched, mind you. After the “Golden Age”, and the fall of superhero comics, the publishers turned their efforts to Westerns and horror.
The story “Tales of the Black Freighter: Marooned”, unravels slowly, issue after issue, until it gets to the chilling conclusion. While I believe the best (and up until now, the only) way to properly experience this is as part of the original context (i.e. by reading it as part of the Watchmen books), it holds its grounds enough to be experienced as a stand alone. Enter “Marooned (The Reconstruction)“.
The guy behind the site, collected each appearance of the TotBF story in Watchment and compiled them to one “issue”. It’s not fully realised/reconstructed, as he refrained from adding any art that wasn’t there originally (which means the first couple of pages contain nothing but narration), but all in all, it really displays the power of Watchmen, that inside that magnificent work, lies a full-blown comic issue.

Speaking of “real” superheroes, I watched “Mystery Men” last week. It’s very much influenced by Watchmen (as anything comics-related, in all honesty, the influence of that book was staggering), but also has a lot of original concepts to hold its own weight. For example, the cast is made of the lower tier or actors. Like their characters. Another thing is the “powers” which are more of a theme than meta-human abilities.
In fact, this idea of real-life superheroes becomes more and more with movies like “The Incredibles“, “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” and the new TV series, “Heroes” (Flash warning). Naturally, this might have the tendency of getting really boring really fast, but until then, enjoy the ride.

Written by Erez

Friday, August 25, 2006 at 1:10

Posted in Comics, Movies, Television

Chapter 24: Of stars and rocks – a memory of accident, or accidental memory? – viewing as vouyerism – a pirated part – the author’s continous decent into insanity

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I’ve been watching a lot of RockStar: Supernova and I just had a very odd… moment.
You see, I’ve watched an elimination episode from week 2 on TV, and therefore had to get past episodes downloaded.
So it took me another week or so before I caught up with the series. I’ve just watched the latest reality episode, and they commented about something I thought I saw on last week’s performance.
Watching that episode, I was under the impression that the singer, Jill, hit Supernova’s guitarist, Gilby Clarke with the mickrophone stand. Accidently, of course, she dropped it or thrown it and it hit him.
They were watching that and commenting on the way you need to know where everyone on the stage is.
The reason why I thought it was odd, was because I was looking for that discussion about people on stage for two weeks now. That’s also the reason why I noticed that mickrophone hit. I was looking for it.

I’ll explain it a bit. As I was going over the three weeks’ worth of episodes (three episodes a week), I had a memory of that elimination episode I watched on TV. That memory was of one of the Supernova group, I think I was under the impression that it was Clark, but it could’ve been Jason Newsted, saying to someone of the contestents something about not hitting people.
I recalled that it was something to do with a stage move that didn’t came right, probably a kick that hit someone (from the audience, perhaps?).
So when the discussion arrived, it wasn’t deja vu, it was “is this from THIS WEEK’S EPISODE?” how the hell do I remember something that was broadcasted TODAY?
True, I could’ve imagined that I watched that incident. A false positive. But it doesn’t change the fact that I actually looked for the performers to hit someone from the band or the audience with their stage act.
A lot of the memory wasn’t a clear-cut “evidence” of whatever happened here. I would’ve probably dismissed it myself, if I haven’t been experiencing it. I mean, I remembered that one contestant performed the same song twice, which was true. The other two songs were previously performed by others in the show, and that made me a bit dazzled about whether I remembered the right songs.
And there was me looking for a minor stage accident. One those things that “just happened”. No bones broken or anything, just someone gets kicked or something. And then one of Supernova commenting about it.
two weeks after I stopped looking (seeing that elimination episode the second time) I found the scene I was looking for. Happening three weeks after I watched that elimination episode the first time. The only episode I had memory of, being the only one I watched up until that point.
Three fucking weeks.

I’m going to sleep over this for a while.

Written by Erez

Wednesday, August 2, 2006 at 23:51

Posted in Music, Television

Watching RockStar: Supernova

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Now I know the true meaning of painful performance. Some people can’t, and shouldn’t legally be allowed on stage.

Written by Erez

Monday, July 24, 2006 at 16:43

Posted in Music, Television

Tidbits and tidbytes

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Actually not much computer related, to be honest

In a (sort of) response/rebuttal to the whole Mohammad Danish cartoons fiasco, “Dimona Comics” have announced an “Israeli Anti-Semitic Cartoons Contest“. One of the judges will be none other than the semi legendary Art Spiegelman, also known as the creator of Maus, one of comics’ seminal masterpieces.

Ronald Moore, producer of the current incarnation of Battlestar Galactica (a.k.a. the gift that keeps on giving), said some stuff about the show, video games and whatever else he had on his mind.

I’m a fan of The Prisoner, no secret there, so here are scans of three “novelisations” and a Jack Kirby The Prisoner comics.

The above two links are courtesy of the Website at the End of the Universe, which also obituaries the passing away of Science Fiction writer Stanislav Lem.

Finally, some notes on how to finally get rid of that mind-numbing, productivity-stamping, over-rated, user-unfriendly computer peripheral, the mouse.

Written by Erez

Tuesday, March 28, 2006 at 11:56

Isaac Haze?

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I had the laugh of my life reading about Hayes’ leaving SouthPark over their misrepresentation of Scientology, but it seems we haven’t heard the last of it, as according to FoxNews, Hayes did not quit the show. On the other hand, it seems that SouthPark’s creators want to get even with Hayes for leaving the show, by doing an episode that will parodise Chef, Hayes’ SouthPark character.

Has my ears gotten insane? So what is it?
Stay Tuned! (always wanted to say that)

Written by Erez

Wednesday, March 22, 2006 at 16:08

Posted in Humour, Television

Is that a slash in your dot?

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Or are you just happy to… Err… Let’s not go there, shall we?

Some recent Slashdotting.

Most “main-stream” GNU/Linux distros nowadays go with the “pre-compiled packages” solution to software installation. This goes against the compile from source concept which is, for many GNU/Linux purists, the whole heart and soul of the whole GNU/Linux concept (or the bread-and-butter of it, pick your choice), as the actual compiling method allows the user to configure and customise the software to his needs, preferences and optimal system compatibility. This article tests both options.

One of the Mars rovers, Spirit, has lost one of it’s 6 wheels. Not bad for something that wasn’t supposed to last more than 3 months, now well into its second year, or to quote NASA “two years into its 90-day mission” Much like the Star Trek franchise which after almost 40 years into its 5 year mission has lost all the brakes.

Speaking of Open Source, the Economist runs a (somewhat clueless, it seems) article regarding open source projects, citing MySQL, Firefox and, well, Wikipedia as examples of a method of which “Its advantage is that anyone can contribute; the drawback is that sometimes just about anyone does.” Which serves as a lesson to kids everywhere that writing under the influence of drugs is not a good habit.
Hehe. Sorry.
I think the biggest confusion here is by bundling open-source software projects with the “communal-edited” Wikipedia. Open-source projects are not chaotic, anarchic, or “contributed by anyone”. These projects have a maintaining body, which has the final word on what goes in and what not. Contributions are welcomed, but do not immediately become part of the product, even when the nature of the contribution is a free-for-all one. For example, while anyone can create a Firefox extension, those are not available as an integral part of the downloaded software (i.e. “The product”), but are presented on a separate “use at your own risk” basis. Other products, like the Debian Distro, goes even further and restrict the software packages submitting to authorised maintainers. This is why the Wikipedia concept is not a good example of Open-Source or, to quote the NYTimes, “Anonymous Source Is Not the Same as Open Source.” The “everyone can do anything” method is just not the same as open-source development, not by far.

And, a double-duo couple of two Microsoft issues:
An analysis of .NET usage in vista shows that “Vista has no services implemented in .NET“. Always nice to see a company backing up their own technology. Almost makes one wonder what are the Mono guys doing supporting this framework while its creators prefer running native code to utilising the .NET framework. Once again, it seems developers and companies are falling for Microsoft PR rather than the simple reality.
Which speaks volumes for the next article, claiming “Windows Vista’s tough approach to spyware may put anti-spyware companies out of business“. But seriously, folks. I’ll believe it when I see it. Marketing your yet-to-be-released product as “100% spyware proof” to a point where it will cause anti-spyware companies to go out of business just don’t cut it in my book. Remember Bill Gates announcement at 2004 that “Two years from now, spam will be solved“? Remember Gates claiming, this year, that Microsoft has, true to its word, eliminated spam? I just hope their concept of “eliminating spyware” isn’t as fuzzy as their concept of spam-removing.

Written by Erez

Monday, March 20, 2006 at 7:07